Tulsa Real Estate Fund

Who We Are & What We've Done...

  • Tulsa Real Estate Fund is an economic vehicle named in honor of Black Wall Street which was created in the Greenwood District of Tulsa, OK by O.W. Gurley and represented one of the most prominent concentrations of African-American businesses in the United States during the early 20th century.

  • TREF is a Purpose-Built Fund with a double bottom line of 1) serving our community, and 2) producing a reasonable rate-of-return on capital contribution.

  • TREF is made up of 14K+ individuals, families, and small businesses who came together and contributed capital to take action and improve the circumstances of OUR COMMUNITY.

  • TREF invested private capital with six African American developers totaling more than $7,000,000 in private capital. Many of these developers commented that they struggled to secure private financing from main street banks even though the fundamentals of their real estate deals were favorable.

  • TREF invested nearly $1,000,000 in private capital with two African American women.

  • The Tulsa Real Estate Fund has received national recognition from Forbes, dozens of local news broadcasts, national print write-ups and online magazine coverage for both the historical significance of the fund and its early success in capital fund raising.

original
1 +
Partners
$ 1 M USD
Total Estimated Capital Raised
>$ 1 M USD
Total Capital Deployed

Awards & Acknowledgement

Our Early Accomplishments

On June 1st, 2018, Tulsa Real Estate Fund launched the first Black Owned Reg A+ crowd sourced equity Real Estate Fund.

Over $6 million was raised within the first weeks.

By July, 2018 Nine Thousand Partners had became a part of the TREF community. Many were unaccredited, first-time Real Estate Investors.

Founding Partners' names were memorialized on the
Legacy Wall housed at the TREF Legacy Center.

How We Got Started

Demacratizing Equity Ownership in Real Estate Assets

Urban neighborhoods across the nation do not have control of our dollars or our real estate, and it is difficult for minority developers to secure funding for real estate redevelopment projects in our communities.
 
As a result, urban neighborhoods are being developed by outside individuals who do not share the same interests as the community they’re gentrifying. This development without the equitable participation of the Black community, leads to the displacement of longtime residents and the fleecing of property equity from the very people being displaced.
 
Through Tulsa Real Estate Fund, we’ve pooled our capital to begin taking control of our dollars and the real estate in our communities.